Ebb, 1996 – By Amy Jenkins

Originally trained as a photographer, United States artist Amy Jenkins began using video as a static element within her practice. Jenkins’ more recent works use sculpture and video installation to displace notions of space and object. In Ebb (1996) a miniature bathtub begins as a fount of bloody water, which is projected onto its porcelain surface. Jenkins creates a four-minute loop where a woman (the artist) climbs into the tub and the blood flow acts like a receding tide into her body, in effect reversing the menstrual flow. Ebb refers to receding menstruation, a soaking up of life force and an internal receiving.(1) It is a process of purification in reverse. The artist fortified by her transfusion, submerges herself, then steps out of the bath and disappears, leaving the viewer alone temporarily in the dark void of the gallery space.

(1) Ebb has a companion work Flow (2005), a nine-minute time-lapse over nine months of pregnancy, (one minute per month). Flow “is an allegory for the act of creating, or bringing forth form the self.” Amy Jenkins. “Flow, 2005.” Artist Website. Amy Jenkins.net. Accessed July 2, 2012. http://www.amyjenkins.net/video%20pages/flow.html.

Amy Jenkins, Ebb, (1996), Video projection on miniature ceramic tub and tiled pedestal, audio; sculpture dimensions: 14h x 20w x 26d”; original running time: 4 minutes

Amy Jenkins, Ebb, (1996), Video projection on miniature ceramic tub and tiled pedestal, audio; sculpture dimensions: 14h x 20w x 26d”; original running time: 4 minutes

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s